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Resources - Beyond The Hashtag

Resources

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” – Nelson Mandela

 

 

This page has been built as a toolkit, for people that want to do more than support on social media. We hope you can use them to learn, support and take action, making this a movement not a moment, and going #BeyondTheHashtag. These resources feature information for people of all ages, and are aimed to elevate Black voices, and help you find the actionable information you need to do the work of anti-racism. 


This resource is a work-in-progress and we will keep adding to it as we find additional material. Please send anything you think is missing to hashtagbeyond@gmail.com

Learn

You cannot enjoy the rhythm and ignore the blues” – Amanda Seale

We stand in solidarity with Black communities worldwide, but as our arm of the movement is based in the UK, we have chosen primarily to signpost resources created by British people, about their experiences with race in this country. Racism is not just an American problem – it happens here in Britain every day. Here are some Black voices and stories we want to help amplify.

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Non-fiction bookshelf

  • The Good Immigrant – Nikesh Shukla
  • Brit(ish): On Race, Identity and Belonging – Afua Hirsch
  • Why I’m No Longer Talking To White People About Race – Reni Eddo-Lodge
  • Natives: Race and Class in the Ruins of Empire – Akala
  • Black and British: A Forgotten History – David Olusoga
  • The Terrible – Yrsa Daley-Ward
  • I Am Not Your Baby Mother – Candice Brathwaite
  • Feminism, Interrupted – Lola Olufemi
  • Black, Listed: Black British Culture Explored – Jeffrey Boakye
  • There Ain’t No Black in the Union Jack – Paul Gilroy
  • Don’t Touch My Hair – Emma Dabiri
  • Staying Power: The History of Black People in Britain – Peter Fryer
  • Afropean – Johny Pitts
  • Afrofeminism and Black Feminism in Europe – Akwugo Emejulu and Francesca Sobande
  • Uprooting Racism: How White People Can Work for Racial Justice – Paul Kivel

Non Fiction Bookshelf

  • The Good Immigrant – Nikesh Shukla
  • Brit(ish): On Race, Identity and Belonging – Afua Hirsch
  • Why I’m No Longer Talking To White People About Race – Reni Eddo-Lodge
  • Natives: Race and Class in the Ruins of Empire – Akala
  • Black and British: A Forgotten History – David Olusoga
  • The Terrible – Yrsa Daley-Ward
  • I Am Not Your Baby Mother – Candice Brathwaite
  • Feminism, Interrupted – Lola Olufemi
  • Black, Listed: Black British Culture Explored – Jeffrey Boakye
  • There Ain’t No Black in the Union Jack – Paul Gilroy
  • Don’t Touch My Hair – Emma Dabiri
  • Staying Power: The History of Black People in Britain – Peter Fryer
  • Race, Sexuality and Identity in Britain and Jamaica: The Biography of Patrick Nelson, 1916-1963 – Gemma Romain
  • Me and White Supremacy – Layla Saad
  • Afropean – Johny Pitts
  • Afrofeminism and Black Feminism in Europe – Akwugo Emejulu and Francesca Sobande
  • Uprooting Racism: How White People Can Work for Racial Justice – Paul Kivel
  • Bristol: Ethnic Minorities and the City, 1000-2001 – Madge Dresser, Peter Fleming
  • On Being Human as Praxis – Sylvia Wynter
  • Antagonist, Advocates and Allies: The Wake Up Call Guide for White Women Who Want to Become Allies with Black Women – Catrice M Jackson

Further Reading

We see you and your black life matters – BlackOut UK

Books for Kids

  • Anti Racist Baby – Ibram X. Kendi
  • Last Stop on Market Street – Matt de la Peña
  • Little Legends: Exceptional Women in Black History – Vashi Harrison
  • Let’s Talk About Race – Julius Lester
  • Sulwe – Lupita Nyong’o
  • The Colors Of Us – Karen Katz
  • Hair Love – Matthew A. Cherry
  • Look Up! – Nathan Bryon and Dapo Adeola
  • The Silence Seeker – Ben Morley
  • The Boy At the Back of the Class – Onjali Q. Rauf
  • My Hair – Hannah Lee

support

There are many ways to support #BlackLivesMatter and it doesn’t start and stop with donating to funds and charities. Make supporting the black community in Bristol, the UK, and the world an integral part of your day-to-day life.

Social media – who to follow

take action

If you are neutral in situations of injustice you have chosen the side of the oppressor” – Desmond Tutu

These are suggestions of ways you can use your voice and platform to strengthen the fight against racism in your community.

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Protesting in a pandemic

Black Lives Matter London is calling for protestors to self-isolate for two weeks if participating in city-wide protests. Black Lives Matter Bristol has posted advice on their Facebook page. We suggest anyone who is physically attending a march in Bristol or across the country to follow this approach:

 

  • If you have any symptoms of Covid-19 please stay home. 
  • Wear a mask
  • Maintain social distancing
  • Carry water and anti-bacterial wipes with you 
  • Bring only what you need. Use apps such as Signal or WhatsApp to communicate. Consider using a burner phone.
  • Other advice on how to stay safe from The Face.

petitions

Support black businesses

Supporting black-owned businesses supports their families and helps black communities thrive. You can help support black communities by buying from independent black businesses. Major retailers can also support businesses and express their commitment to equality by buying their inventory from black-owned businesses.

 

Support black artists